May 30, 2015

Queen rearing class with Jeff Eckel from Instar Apiaries. Jeff manages the bees at the Wyck House and a few other locations and has lots of experience rearing Varroa Sensitive Hygenic bees. In this class we grafted 24hr old larva (hatches after 3 days as egg) into queen cells and primed them with royal jelly from a dropper. Suprisingly, the queen bars and cells can be handled upside down and will not fall out. One must take care to keep the larva moist while handling and completing the grafting process.

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May 23, 2015

Supercedure queen cell found. This indicates that the colony is unsatisfied with the egg-laying performance of their current queen and are therefore ousting here to may way for a more favorable queen. Honey bees make supercedure queen cells toward the center of the frame as opposed to swarm queen cells, which are usually found toward the bottom of the frame. In any case, all queen cells are drawn vertically and are much larger than those of regular worker cells.